South Carolina Coast Ordered To Evacuate Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

Jan Cross
September 11, 2018

More than a million people were ordered Monday to evacuate the path of Hurricane Florence as the Category 4 storm packing winds of 130 miles per hour (195 kilometers per hour) bore down on the East Coast of the United States.

Carrying winds of up to 140 miles per hour as a Category 4 storm, Hurricane Florence is expected to strengthen and become a Category 5 storm Tuesday.

While in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, many are getting ready for life off the grid, buying up generators, flashlights, water and lots of plywood to cover up windows.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam also issued mandatory evacuations to begin Tuesday morning for the most low-lying, flood prone areas of the state - the Eastern Shore and a section of coast identified by officials as "Zone A".

The center of the hurricane is forecast to move across the Atlantic Ocean between Bermuda and the Bahamas tomorrow and Wednesday (Sept. 11-12), before approaching the southeastern coast of the US on Thursday.

He estimated about 1 million residents would flee the coast of his state, following earlier orders for the evacuation of more than 50,000 people from the southern-most Outer Banks barrier islands of North Carolina.

"North Carolina is taking Hurricane Florence seriously, and you should, too", Cooper said. "This is going to be a statewide event".

With sustained winds howling at almost 220km per hour, Florence was upgraded to a Category 4 by the National Hurricane Center yesterday, as the tempest churned about 965 kilometres southeast of Bermuda and headed toward the East Coast.

As of 12pm EST, the storm was centered approximately 1,230 miles from Cape Fear, North Carolina.

There have been 3 hurricanes in the Atlantic at least 3 times in the last 9 years so this is not unprecedented.

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President Donald Trump on Monday urged "the incredible citizens of North Carolina, South Carolina and the entire East Coast" to "take all necessary precautions" as the storm approaches.

Areas under the Storm Surge Watch could see life-threatening inundation with rising waters moving inland from the coast over the next two days.

"Florence is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 15 to 20 inches with isolated maxima to 30 inches near Florence's track over portions of North Carolina, Virginia, and northern SC through Saturday", says the National Hurricane Center.

The Monday evening update from the National Hurricane Center shows Florence isn't done gaining energy. That could prolong a period of heavy rain across inland areas leading to devastating flooding.

The storm is expected to reach SC and North Carolina later this week.

"It's scary to all of us".

"It's not just the coast", Graham said.

Storms increase in frequency and intensity by mid-August and into September as temperatures in the Atlantic climb to their highest levels, Javaheri said.

In Holden Beach, North Carolina, in the storm's path, long-time residents were busy preparing. It said about 750 military personnel will be designated to provide support.

Almost 30 ships were preparing to depart early yesterday. It's possible it could become a Category 5 storm.

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