Valve brings back game streaming with Steam Link Anywhere

Gerald Bowen
March 16, 2019

Steam Link Anywhere faces the same infrastructure limitations as other streaming game services-you won't get anywhere without a fast, firm network connection-but if Valve can get the performance to a reasonably good level without requiring network speeds that 95 percent of the world doesn't have access to yet, it could be a very exciting step forward. The new Steam Link Anywhere extends the Steam Link functionality, while a sockets API makes it easier for developers to offer secure connections. As before, Valve recommends that users are connected to a high-speed internet connection via a 5GHz frequency. Anyone with home streaming set up from their PC and either a Steam Link box or app elsewhere can play their games on the go. A bigger one is that the service is now available exclusively on the dedicated Steam Link microconsole - a somewhat odd decision, given that the Steam Link was discontinued in November a year ago. Once again, bear in mind that the app is still in its beta phase, meaning that users will likely encounter some issues with the app. Most HEXUS regulars will already be aware of Steam Link (and the earlier hardware-only solution) which facilitates Steam gaming on the same local network as your Steam library packing PC.

In order to access the beta, you'll need to opt-in to the Steam client beta on desktop and have the latest version installed. After that, all you need to do according to Valve is add a new computer and select "Other Computer" and then follow the pairing instructions that appear before you're ready to get to playing.

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Game streaming is becoming more and more popular as time goes on.

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